Tag Archives: Craig Santos Perez

Craig Santos Perez: The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From (Part 6)

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[Previous installments of Craig Santos Perez's "The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From," are here: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5] 10 George Anson, British commander of a naval squadron, was sent in 1740 to attack Spanish colonies during the War of the Austrian Succession. On his military Read More …

Craig Santos Perez: The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From (Part 5)

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[Previous installments of Craig Santos Perez's "The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From," are here: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4] 8 The imagination is an Oceania of possibilities. The blank page is an excerpt of the Pacific, a blank map haunted by story. Each word is an island. The Read More …

Craig Santos Perez: The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From (Part 4)

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[Previous installments of Craig Santos Perez's "The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From," are here: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3] 7 My first book includes four different maps (illustrated by Ben Viwatmanitsakul). The first (on page 28) shows Guam as an important stop on the Spanish Galleon trade route between Acapulco Read More …

Craig Santos Perez: The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From (Part 3)

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[Previous installments of Craig Santos Perez's "The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From," are here: Part 1 | Part 2] 5  As a poet, I’m interested in both what is seen and unseen. Visible and invisible lines. They say “latitude” was determined from the altitude of the sun at noon with the Read More …

Craig Santos Perez: The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From (Part 2)

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[To read part 1 of "The Poetics of Mapping Diaspora, Navigating Culture, and Being From," click here.] 3 European cartographic representations of the Pacific Ocean first developed at the end of the 15th century, when the Americas were incorporated into maps. The Pacific became a wide mostly empty space separating Asia and America. With Europe Read More …